Studying at the University of Verona

Here you can find information on the organisational aspects of the Programme, lecture timetables, learning activities and useful contact details for your time at the University, from enrolment to graduation.

Academic calendar

The academic calendar shows the deadlines and scheduled events that are relevant to students, teaching and technical-administrative staff of the University. Public holidays and University closures are also indicated. The academic year normally begins on 1 October each year and ends on 30 September of the following year.

Academic calendar

Course calendar

The Academic Calendar sets out the degree programme lecture and exam timetables, as well as the relevant university closure dates..

Definition of lesson periods
Period From To
Sem. 1A Sep 24, 2018 Nov 10, 2018
Sem. 1B Nov 19, 2018 Jan 12, 2019
Sem. 2A Feb 18, 2019 Mar 30, 2019
Sem. 2B Apr 8, 2019 Jun 1, 2019
Exam sessions
Session From To
Sessione d'esame invernale Jan 14, 2019 Feb 16, 2019
Sessione d'esame estiva (gli esami sono sospesi durante la sessione di laurea) Jun 3, 2019 Jul 27, 2019
Sessione d'esame autunnale Aug 26, 2019 Sep 21, 2019
Degree sessions
Session From To
Sessione di laurea estiva Jul 8, 2019 Jul 13, 2019
Sessione di laurea autunnale Nov 4, 2019 Nov 9, 2019
Sessione di laurea invernale Mar 30, 2020 Apr 4, 2020
Holidays
Period From To
Festa di Ognissanti Nov 1, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Sospensione dell'attività didattica Nov 2, 2018 Nov 3, 2018
Festa dell’Immacolata Dec 8, 2018 Dec 8, 2018
Vacanze di Natale Dec 24, 2018 Jan 5, 2019
Vacanze di Pasqua Apr 19, 2019 Apr 23, 2019
Sospensione attività didattica Apr 24, 2019 Apr 27, 2019
Festa della liberazione Apr 25, 2019 Apr 25, 2019
Festa del lavoro May 1, 2019 May 1, 2019
Festa del Santo Patrono May 21, 2019 May 21, 2019
Festa della Repubblica Jun 2, 2019 Jun 2, 2019
Vacanze Estive Aug 12, 2019 Aug 17, 2019

Exam calendar

Exam dates and rounds are managed by the relevant Culture and Civilisation Teaching and Student Services Unit.
To view all the exam sessions available, please use the Exam dashboard on ESSE3.
If you forgot your login details or have problems logging in, please contact the relevant IT HelpDesk, or check the login details recovery web page.

Exam calendar

Should you have any doubts or questions, please check the Enrolment FAQs

Academic staff

B C D F H L M N O P R S T U V Z

Barbierato Federico

federico.barbierato@univr.it 045 802 8351

Bassetti Massimiliano

massimiliano.bassetti@univr.it 045802 8376

Basso Patrizia

patrizia.basso@univr.it +39 045802 8638

Beghini Giulia

giulia.beghini_01@univr.it/ giuliabeg@libero.it /

Borghetti Vincenzo

vincenzo.borghetti@univr.it +39 045 802 8584

Buonopane Alfredo

alfredo.buonopane@univr.it +39 0458028120

Camurri Renato

renato.camurri@univr.it +39 045 802 8635

Concina Chiara Maria

chiara.concina@univr.it +39 045 802 8325

Cotticelli Paola

paola.cotticelli@univr.it +39 045802 8587

Dal Pozzolo Enrico

enrico.dalpozzolo@univr.it +39 045802 8569

Danelon Fabio

fabio.danelon@univr.it 045/8028378

De Paolis Paolo

paolo.depaolis@univr.it +39 045 802 8371

De Prisco Antonio

antonio.deprisco@univr.it +39 045 802 8553

Forner Fabio

fabio.forner@univr.it + 39 045 802 8194

Franco Tiziana

tiziana.franco@univr.it +39 045802 8380

Hatzikiriakos Alexandros Maria

alexandrosmaria.hatzikiriakos@univr.it

Minozzi Stefano

stefano.minozzi@univr.it +39 045 8028553

Molteni Monica

monica.molteni@univr.it 045 8028021

Natale Massimo

massimo.natale@univr.it 045 802 8117

Ophaelders Markus Georg

markus.ophalders@univr.it 045-8028732

Pagliaroli Stefano

stefano.pagliaroli@univr.it +39 045 8028056

Panattoni Riccardo

riccardo.panattoni@univr.it +39 045 802 8185

Pasqualicchio Nicola

nicola.pasqualicchio@univr.it 0458028585

Pellegrini Paolo

paolo.pellegrini@univr.it +39 045 802 8559

Piovan Dino

dino.piovan@univr.it

Ponchia Simonetta

simonetta.ponchia@univr.it +39 045802 8365

Prandi Luisa

luisa.prandi@univr.it +39 045 802 8718

Raccanelli Renata

renata.raccanelli@univr.it 0458028366

Ricottilli Licinia

licinia.ricottilli@univr.it +39 045802 8366

Rizza Alfredo

alfredo.rizza@univr.it +39 045802 8587

Rodighiero Andrea

andrea.rodighiero@univr.it +39 045 802 8643

Sandrini Giuseppe

giuseppe.sandrini@univr.it 045 802 8069

Scandola Alberto

alberto.scandola@univr.it 045.8028586

Scattolin Paolo

paolo.scattolin@univr.it +39 045 802 8645

Soldani Arnaldo

arnaldo.soldani@univr.it 045 - 8028648

Stavru Alessandro

alessandro.stavru@univr.it 045 8028143

Stoffella Marco

marco.stoffella@univr.it +39 045802 8376

Tani Stefano

stefano.tani@univr.it +39 045802 8110

Terraroli Valerio

valerio.terraroli@univr.it 0458028441

Ugolini Gherardo

gherardo.ugolini@univr.it +39 0458028665

Vannini Carlo

carlo.vannini@accademiabelleartiverona.it

Varanini Gian Maria

gianmaria.varanini@univr.it

Viola Corrado

corrado.viola@univr.it +39 045802 8194

Zangrandi Alessandra

alessandra.zangrandi@univr.it 0458028115

Study Plan

The Study Plan includes all modules, teaching and learning activities that each student will need to undertake during their time at the University. Please select your Study Plan based on your enrolment year.

CURRICULUM TIPO:
ModulesCreditsTAFSSD
6
B
L-FIL-LET/04
1 module to be chosen among the following
6
B
M-FIL/04
2 modules to be chosen among the following
6
B
L-FIL-LET/02
6
B
L-FIL-LET/02
6
B
L-FIL-LET/02
1 module to be chosen among the following
6
B
L-FIL-LET/04

1° Year

ModulesCreditsTAFSSD
6
B
L-FIL-LET/04
1 module to be chosen among the following
6
B
M-FIL/04
2 modules to be chosen among the following
6
B
L-FIL-LET/02
6
B
L-FIL-LET/02
6
B
L-FIL-LET/02
1 module to be chosen among the following
6
B
L-FIL-LET/04
Modules Credits TAF SSD
Between the years: 1°- 2°
Between the years: 1°- 2°
Further language skills (B2 level)
6
F
-
Between the years: 1°- 2°
Other activitites
3
F
-

Legend | Type of training activity (TTA)

TAF (Type of Educational Activity) All courses and activities are classified into different types of educational activities, indicated by a letter.




S Placements in companies, public or private institutions and professional associations

iIntroductory
padvanced
mMasterful

Teaching code

4S007394

Teacher

Tosca Lynch

Coordinatore

Tosca Lynch

Credits

6

Language

English en

Scientific Disciplinary Sector (SSD)

L-FIL-LET/02 - GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Period

Sem 1A, Sem 1B

Location

VERONA

Learning outcomes

The course offers a comprehensive insight of the metres and the rhythms of the Greek poetic tradition, with specific attention to:
(a) the relation existing between metrics and textual interpretation;
(b) the literary analysis of the texts.
The course focuses on:
- Prosody
- Greek lyric metre
- The textual transmission of poetry and its philological and exegetical tradition
- The ancient sources on metrics
- Ancient Greek music and rhythms.
Students will become familiar with the specific vocabulary of the discipline, and will apply it to the textual and metrical analysis. They will also be able to recognize the main poetical forms, considered under a critical perspective and placed within the frame of the history of the discipline on a case-by-case basis (with special reference to companions, monographs, essays, and lexica focused on the topic).
Knowledge of Greek language is mandatory.

Program

[Please see below for an updated version of the prerequisites and learning outcomes for Dr Lynch's course]


PROGRAMME AND METHODOLOGY

The present course will offer an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to the study of ancient Greek metre and rhythm, rooted in the awareness that ancient Mousikē – ‘the arts of the Muses’ – did not cover only music, poetry or any other individual form of expression but was intrinsically multimedia in nature.
The approach to ancient metre and rhythm that will be presented in this course will therefore combine traditional philological and literary elements with musical as well as philosophical approaches, in keeping with the latest research insights and methods developed in the study of ancient Greek music.

Ancient Greece was a ‘song culture’, and our work will be constantly informed by the awareness that Archaic and Classical Greek poetry was not simply read/recited, but was primarily composed to be sung, and at times also danced.

Hence we will examine metrical forms in the light of the specific kinds of performances they were traditionally associated with (e.g. dactylic hexameters in the performance context of Homeric poetry, and in the light of the metrical and rhythmical evidence preserved by Aristides Quintilianus and Dionysius of Halicarnassus; dochmiacs in the light of their use in tragedy as well as the ethical/aesthetic features that are associated with them in ancient scholarship,and their appearance in one of the most famous Greek musical fragments that have survived to date, which comes from Euripides’ Orestes; and so on for other kinds of metres).

Given that Greek metre was explicitly conceptualized as a component of musical rhythm at least from Classical times, we will integrate metrical notions with rhythmical ones. We will therefore look at some basic aspects of ancient rhythmics as well as the aesthetic characterization and perception of different rhythms and their basic elements.

Our work will be based on original sources as much as possible, starting from English translations offered in the books listed as essential in the bibliography given below (point 1a). Students who have prior knowledge of ancient Greek should consult also the critical editions listed under 1b.

Further texts and English translations will be circulated in class; handbooks and other reference works will be mentioned whenever relevant, and will be useful for further independent study (see point 2 below).


PRACTICALITIES

All lectures and tutorials will be delivered in English, but Dr Lynch is bilingual in English and Italian and will therefore be able to answer questions in Italian too, addressing any unclear aspects if necessary.

The tutorial elements of this course will feature a ‘hands-on’ approach, including basic training in metrical scansion. Therefore attendance is strongly recommended; students who cannot attend in person, but are still interested in taking the exam, can contact Dr Lynch to make individual arrangements.

Lectures will begin on October 1st 2019 and will run until mid-December.
We will have two lectures per week, with the exception of the second week of October and the first week of December.

The final timetable will be confirmed as soon as possible.


PREREQUISITES

Prior knowledge of Ancient Greek will be required only for students reading 'Tradizione e interpretazione dei testi letterari' (see the bibliography detailed below; further details will be given in class).

The course is however open also to students reading other subjects, or coming from different backgrounds, who do not have prior knowledge of ancient Greek but are interested in the topics we will discuss.

They are warmly invited to join the course too – as clarified above, we will work primarily on English translations of ancient sources on metre and rhythm; and other basic aspects of Greek prosody and metre will be explained in terms accessible to students who know how to read the Greek alphabet.
Greekless students will therefore need to learn the alphabet and practice reading elementary Greek sentences on their own (even if they won’t be able to translate them): these skills can be easily acquired by consulting the pronunciation guide and practice exercises given on Mastronarde's excellent website AtticGreek.org.
Said students would also greatly benefit from attending the 'Laboratory of Ancient Greek' that will start in the first semester, taught by Dr Dino Piovan. More advanced metrical/rhythmical skills will be acquired in class, and will be assessed in the final exam in keeping with the students' prior acquaintance with ancient languages.

Hence the only absolute prerequisite to attend and profit from this course is having an interest in interdisciplinary approaches to ancient literature and music, and a willingness to engage with ancient texts in a fresh way.


LEARNING OUTCOMES

The primary aim of this course is for students to become familiar with the terminology and concepts that characterized the ancient Greek study of metrics and rhythmics as components of the wider study of musical performances.

They will also acquire basic knowledge of the prosodic features of the ancient Greek language, and of the main families of lyric metres employed in Archaic and Classical poetry, with special emphasis on tragic metre.

Students will also be aware of the interplay between metrical and rhythmical forms, and the possible transformations that metrical sequences underwent in rhythmical delivery (rhythmopoiia), as described in ancient sources.

Finally, students will be acquainted with some ancient Greek musical fragments, and will understand the criteria that inform their transcription into modern musical notation.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

1a. Essential for all students

Primary sources (in translation)

• Barker, A. 1989. Greek Musical Writings 2. Cambridge. (esp. pp. 392–494, Aristides Quintilianus, Books I and II; and pp. 185–189, Aristoxenus’ Elementa Rhythmica).
• Pearson, L. 1990. Aristoxenus, Elementa rhythmica. Oxford. (extracts)
• Kovacs, D. 1994 Euripides. Cyclops. Alcestis. Medea (Loeb Classical Library 12). Harvard.

Secondary literature

• West. M. L. 1987. Introduction to Greek Metre. Oxford.
• West, M. L. 1992/1994. Ancient Greek Music. Oxford. (esp. pp. 129–159, ‘Rhythm and Tempo’)
• Silva Barris, J. 2010. Metre and Rhythm in Greek Verse. Vienna.
• Lynch, T. 2016. ‘Arsis and Thesis in Ancient Rhythmics and Metrics: a New Approach’, Classical Quarterly 66.2, pp. 491–513. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0009838816000756

1b. Critical editions/commentaries to be consulted by students who have prior knowledge of ancient Greek ('Tradizione')

• Winnington-Ingram, R. P. 1963. Aristidis Quintiliani De musica libri tres (Bibliotheca Scriptorum Graecorum Et Romanorum Teubneriana). Leipzig.
• Pearson, L. 1990. Aristoxenus, Elementa rhythmica. Oxford. (Greek texts)
• Najock, D. 1975. Anonyma de musica scripta Bellermanniana (Bibliotheca Scriptorum Graecorum Et Romanorum Teubneriana). Leipzig.
• Jan, C. von. 1895. Musici scriptores Graeci (Bibliotheca Scriptorum Graecorum Et Romanorum Teubneriana). Leipzig.
• Mastronarde, D. 2002. Euripides: Medea (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics). Cambridge.

2. General reference works, handbooks and companions

• West, M. L. 1982. Greek Metre. Oxford.
• Pöhlmann, E. & West, M. L. 2001. Documents of Ancient Greek Music. Oxford.
• Martinelli, M.M. 1995. Gli strumenti del poeta. Elementi di metrica greca. Bologna
• Ercoles, M. 2016. ‘La Metrica Greca Oggi: Principali Tendenze; Aggionamento’, in Maas, P. La Metrica Greca, Cesena, 201–265. (https://www.academia.edu/39895135/La_metrica_greca_oggi_principali_tendenze )
• Budelmann, F. 2009. The Cambridge Companion to Greek Lyric. Cambridge. (esp. chapters 7–15)
• Lourenço, F. 2011. The Lyric Metres of Euripidean Drama. Coimbra.
• Gentili, B., and Lomiento, L. 2003. Metrica e ritmica. Storia delle forme poetiche nella Grecia antica. Milano.

Further secondary literature will be mentioned in class.

Reference texts
Author Title Publishing house Year ISBN Notes
West, M. L. Ancient Greek Music Oxford 1994 (esp. pp. 129–159, ‘Rhythm and Tempo’)
Pearson, L. Aristoxenus, Elementa rhythmica. the Fragments of Book II and the additional evidence for Aristoxenean rhythmic theory. Oxford 1990 (extracts)
Lynch, T. 'Arsis and Thesis in Ancient Rhythmics and Metrics: a New Approach’ Classical Quarterly 66.2, pp. 491–513 2016 https://doi.org/10.1017/S0009838816000756
Kovacs, D. Euripides. Cyclops. Alcestis. Medea (Loeb Classical Library 12) Harvard 1994 (Introduction and English translation of Euripides' Medea)
Barker, A. Greek Musical Writings 2 Cambridge 1989 (esp. pp. 392–494, Aristides Quintilianus, Books I and II; and pp. 185–189, Aristoxenus’ Elementa Rhythmica)
West. M. L. Introduction to Greek Metre Oxford 1987
Silva Barris, J. Metre and Rhythm in Greek Verse OEAW, Vienna 2010

Examination Methods

Oral examinations will assess the students’ knowledge and understanding of the basic issues, sources and topics discussed in class. These examinations will cover at least the following topics/skills:

1. the importance and methodological implications of an interdisciplinary study of ancient Greek metre and rhythm; the historical, literary and philological developments of these studies in the last decades; the most important reference works, methods and tools to be employed in the study of Greek and Roman music.
2. the student's knowledge of the basic concepts and categories developed by the ancients in connection with the study of metrics and rhythmics;
3. the student’s familiarity with basic kinds of lyric metres, and some specialised questions concerning tragic forms; in addition, students reading 'Tradizione' will be asked to read and scan a few extracts from Greek texts that we will have discussed in class.
4. Extra marks will be awarded to students who will examine the metrical/rhythmical form of one of the ancient Greek musical documents that they will be free to choose from Pöhlmann, E. & West, M. L. 2001. Documents of Ancient Greek Music. Oxford.


Knowledge of general methodological issues, basic concepts/categories concerning Greek rhythm and metre, and more specialised issues concerning tragedy and metrical scansion will all contribute to the final mark (out of 30). Distinction may also be awarded to excellent candidates.

Type D and Type F activities

prima parte del primo semestre From 9/24/18 To 11/10/18
years Modules TAF Teacher
1° 2° The origins of Christianity F Augusto Barbi (Coordinatore)
Prima parte del primo semestre From 9/24/18 To 11/10/18
years Modules TAF Teacher
1° 2° Laboratory of ancient greek F Dino Piovan (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Latin Laboratory F Evita Calabrese (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Books and writings of the Greek world F Paolo Scattolin (Coordinatore)
seconda parte del primo semestre From 11/19/18 To 1/12/19
years Modules TAF Teacher
1° 2° The origins of Christianity F Augusto Barbi (Coordinatore)
Seconda parte del primo semestre From 11/19/18 To 1/12/19
years Modules TAF Teacher
1° 2° Laboratory of ancient greek F Dino Piovan (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Latin Laboratory F Evita Calabrese (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Books and writings of the Greek world F Paolo Scattolin (Coordinatore)
Prima parte del secondo semestre From 2/18/19 To 3/30/19
years Modules TAF Teacher
Humanistic informatics laboratory (m) F Stefano Minozzi (Coordinatore)
International Conference: Plautus between Text and Stage. F Renata Raccanelli (Coordinatore)
Digital edition of Torquato Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata F Corrado Viola (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Laboratory of photo F Marco Ambrosi (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Laboratory of ancient greek F Dino Piovan (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Latin Laboratory F Evita Calabrese (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Opera Workshop F Nicola Pasqualicchio (Coordinatore)
1° 2° SFIDE - Europe F Gherardo Ugolini (Coordinatore)
Seconda parte del secondo semestre From 4/8/19 To 6/1/19
years Modules TAF Teacher
Humanistic informatics laboratory (m) F Stefano Minozzi (Coordinatore)
Digital edition of Torquato Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata F Corrado Viola (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Laboratory of ancient greek F Dino Piovan (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Latin Laboratory F Evita Calabrese (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Opera Workshop F Nicola Pasqualicchio (Coordinatore)
1° 2° Stranalandia. Dalla narrazione al teatro F Nicola Pasqualicchio (Coordinatore)

Career prospects


Module/Programme news

News for students

There you will find information, resources and services useful during your time at the University (Student’s exam record, your study plan on ESSE3, Distance Learning courses, university email account, office forms, administrative procedures, etc.). You can log into MyUnivr with your GIA login details.

Linguistic training CLA


Double Degree

The University of Verona, through a network of agreements with foreign universities, offers international courses that enable students to gain a Double/Joint degree at the time of graduation. Indeed, students enrolled in a Double/Joint degree programme will be able to obtain both the degree of the University of Verona and the degree issued by the Partner University abroad - where they are expected to attend part of the programme -, in the time it normally takes to gain a common Master’s degree. The institutions concerned shall ensure that both degrees are recognised in the two countries.

Places on these programmes are limited, and admissions and any applicable grants are subject to applicants being selected in a specific Call for applications.

The latest Call for applications for Double/Joint Degrees at the University of Verona is available now!


Graduation

List of theses and work experience proposals

theses proposals Research area
tesi di Glottologia, Storia comparata, Linguistica storica ENGLISH LANGUAGE - Grammar and Syntax – Grammatik und Syntax
tesi di Glottologia, Storia comparata, Linguistica storica GERMANIC LANGUAGE - Dialectology - Dialektologie
tesi di Glottologia, Storia comparata, Linguistica storica HUMANITIES & SOCIAL STUDIES - HUMANITIES & SOCIAL STUDIES
tesi di Glottologia, Storia comparata, Linguistica storica Indo-European languages & literatures - Indo-European languages & literatures
tesi di Glottologia, Storia comparata, Linguistica storica LINGUISTICS - LINGUISTICS

Student mentoring


Requisiti classi di abilitazione insegnamento

Requisiti necessari per accedere alle classi di abilitazione per l'insegnamento.
vedi allegato pdf

Inoltre, per informazioni sui 24 CFU nelle discipline antropo-psico-pedagogiche e nelle metodologie e tecnologie didattiche, si veda -> LINK 

Attachments

Title Info File
Doc_Univr_pdf Classi insegnamento con LM-14 307 KB, 30/11/21 

Gestione carriere


Area riservata studenti